Wikileaks: The Beginning of a Global Nation?

Since it’s creation in 2006, Wikileaks has caused much controversy and has raised issues which, previously, had not been discussed. One of these is the idea of a “stateless news organisation” (Rosen 2010) which has caused quite a bit of fuss over the past decade. On Wikileaks’ twitter account it’s description states that it is “everywhere” and the website is worked on by many different people all over the globe. Which raises the question: which nation’s laws apply to an organisation that is based everywhere? 

According to Rosen (2010) this has caused confusion in the U.S., with the government claiming that Wikileaks should be reprimanded because “this leak will harm national security.” After war logs from Afghanistan were leaked in 2010, U.S. authorities intended to prosecute Wikileaks due to the belief that they had broken national laws (Coddington 2012, p 377). However as a stateless organisation Wikileaks isn’t based in America, so what laws do apply? 

After this problem, we must ask ourselves: in a time where our world is shrinking, will nations one day be irrelevant? Is it time to start creating global laws? Now, I wouldn’t go as far to say that nations will be completely non-existent in the future, but due to new media it is fair to say that global laws aren’t something that should be completely overlooked. I’m not saying a solution will be easy as cooperation between nations would be extremely difficult in itself. I’m merely pointing out that Wikileaks is an example of how new media today has created a space outside of a tangible place. Changes need to be considered in order to accommodate for this new idea in order to govern and regulate.

References:

Rosen, J. 2010, The Afghanistan War Logs Released by Wikileaks, The World’s First Stateless News Organisation, Press Think, viewed 16 March 2014, http://archive.pressthink.org/2010/07/26/wikileaks_afghan.html

Coddington, M. 2012, ‘Defending a Paradigm by Patrolling a Boundary: Two Global Newspapers’ Approach to WikiLeaks’, Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterlyvol. 89, pp. 377-396.

 

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